SIGNED REMINGTON FAMOUS WOOLY CHAPS BRONZE SCULPTURE COWBOY HORSE

SIGNED REMINGTON FAMOUS WOOLY CHAPS BRONZE SCULPTURE COWBOY HORSE
Condition: This  sculpture is in perfect condition. Bronze Dimensions with Marble  Base:Height 16" x Width 17" Marble Dimensions: 12" X 6.5". Height without base: 15" Weight : 20 LBS Inventory : 80-57782M8908  

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$599.00 tax incl.

57782

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Remington created Wooly Chaps after switching his casting to Roman Bronze Works. Once Remington started using the lost wax casting process he realized how easy it was to manipulate each individual wax to his liking making each casting with different characteristics. Wooly Chaps was created off of the famous bronze the Bronco Buster. Remington made a few changes he liked such as adding the wooly chaps, changing the horse’s tail and adding more texture to the horse’s body hair. This sculpture is very appeasing to the eyes giving you dimension, depth and captured movement. This sculpture has so many details that every time you look at it you are sure to find something new.  This sculpture was cast using the “Lost Wax Method” and has a gorgeous two tone brown patina. This sculpture is mounted on a black marble base and is signed Frederic Remington.

Frederic Remington (1861-1909) was local to New York. He left when he was 19 to explore the Wild West and ended up running a Kansas horse ranch for a while before he left to come back to the East due to its failure. He did however learn many tools that he would later use in his artwork. He is quoted saying “No one can draw equestrian subjects unless he is an equestrian himself.” He learned everything he could about horses, how they move, react, and look right down to the skeletal and muscular structures. He uses all of these elements in his art. He was mainly a painter through his life and didn’t start doing sculptures until the last 14 years of his life. He became well admired by many people including President Theodore Roosevelt who felt that he “portrayed a most characteristic and yet vanishing type of American life.”