SIGNED REMINGTON MOUNTAIN MAN BRONZE SCULPTURE OLD WEST WESTERN INDIAN

SIGNED REMINGTON MOUNTAIN MAN BRONZE SCULPTURE OLD WEST WESTERN INDIAN
Condition: This sculpture is in a very good condition. Bronze Dimensions with Marble Base:Height 21" x Width 16" Marble Dimensions:9 1/2" X 6" Height without base: 20" Weight : 20 LBS Inventory 647157786M46  

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$699.00 tax incl.

57786

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This sculpture is titled “Mountain Man”. It is of a man and his horse ascending down a steep mountain terrain. The mountain man himself carries a long riffle on his side and wears leather chaps, a shirt with tassels and a warm hat. Two bags of supplies hang around his neck by his waist. His hair is long past his shoulders and twisted together from the elements. His face is very weathered with deep lines and a short beard, signifying his long life in the great outdoors. His feet are not in the stirrups as he leans back far allowing the horse to more steadily make his way down the steep slope. The horse he rides is a thoroughbred, lean and fit, he puts his nose close to the ground as he slowly maneuvers himself forward with great care. Sculpture has amazing detail throughout it that make it extremely lifelike. Handmade 100% bronze using the ancient “Lost Wax Method” with a two toned brown patina. Signed Frederic Remington.

 Frederic Remington (1861-1909) was local to New York. He left when he was 19 to explore the Wild West and ended up running a Kansas horse ranch for a while before he left to come back to the East due to its failure. He did however learn many tools that he would later use in his artwork. He is quoted saying “No one can draw equestrian subjects unless he is an equestrian himself.” He learned everything he could about horses, how they move, react, and look right down to the skeletal and muscular structures. He uses all of these elements in his art. He was mainly a painter through his life and didn’t start doing sculptures until the last 14 years of his life. He became well admired by many people including President Theodore Roosevelt who felt that he “portrayed a most characteristic and yet vanishing type of American life.”